that means photography does not reproduce reality

Hi, my name is Julia and my life has become one big Almost Famous reference. Here's some clutter of the people I have been:
photoblog / 8tracks / flickr / lastfm
JULIABERGLUND.COM
Archive / Random / Ask

(Source: diet-broke)

the-tones:

(Fork And Knife) // Brand New 

"I know you’re busy, but please won’t you come visit me?
You are an aimless ghost, you haunt your bag of bones”

(via belligerentsymphonies)

pretendingdivinity:

John Roderick - Scared Straight (Live on KEXP)

grungebook:

Don’t make Mudhoney mad. Watch Mudhoney’s Mark Arm and the Long Winters’ John Roderick in this amusing video for KEXP. (Backstory here.)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

(via foralskelse)

akindofsunlight:

Who I Want You To Love // Bleachers

I’m tired of replacing my dreams. 

(Source: ellenopia, via casimms)

aslowdescent:

Kevin Devine - Doll Parts

(via fuckyeahkdev)

ryanrussell:

#seattle #pnw

ryanrussell:

#seattle #pnw